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Not The Dog's Fault Stamp by Soulful-Purple-Wolf Not The Dog's Fault Stamp by Soulful-Purple-Wolf
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I have a thing about training dogs. I'm not going to say that I am a perfect dog owner or a perfect dog trainer. Not at all. I've been raising service dogs for 5 years now, and my two pet dogs have atrocious manners; from eating off the table to begging and other bad habits.

I dunno, I just felt I needed to post a stamp about this because some people only blame the dog for it's mistakes and they do not take into account that the dog is learning from every experience.

Example? You leave a piece of bread on the table. You leave the room. Dog steals the bread off the table. You come back and scold the dog. Okay fine, this process makes sense. But what is the dog going to do the next time? Steal the bread! Why? Because you are not monitoring the dog. If you were able to catch the dog in the act every time and scold it just by saying Don't in a stern voice, you'd be surprised how well it works. But once the dog picks up this nasty habit, it is really hard to break.

Another example? Dog has to go out. Dog looks at you. You pet dog. Dog still has to go out. Dog pees on the floor. You scold dog. NO! It is not the dog's fault that it had to go out and you didn't take the time to do so! It is also not the dog's fault when you are gone for long periods of time and the dog pees on the floor. When a dog is a puppy, you need to take it out every hour on the hour so that it learns to go outside. But it is YOUR responsibility to watch the dog and make sure that it doesn't need to go out.

Overall, the Dog's manners are dependent on you. This goes for Fighting Dogs too. If the dog was not raised to fight, the dog would not do this!

One problem with this stamp, is if you have a rescue dog, then it is the previous owner's fault. Which is why the dog was rescued in the first place. Good for you for taking on a challenge!

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:iconflameshadow117:
Flameshadow117 Featured By Owner Mar 30, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yes! But slightly no? =P I think a really good trainer can train a dog to be whatever way they want, but certain dogs are by nature more inclined toward things like fear, aggression, barking, chasing, etc. It's like, you could take a completely untrained Newfoundland and a border collie, and put them in a field with sheep, and I can tell you which one, with no prior exposure to sheep, is more likely to go chase those sheep. If you had a wolf-dog, you'd be more likely to see fear or aggression because of the higher levels of adrenaline wolves have. Obviously dogs aren't wolves, but you could imagine it's possible to breed a dog with high adrenaline.  

I just don't think it's fair to say ALL a dog's problems are ENTIRELY from the owner. Obviously, a good owner will mitigate any genetic predispositions with training and socialization, but sometimes dogs just act a certain way and it's hard to convince them not to. 

But, yeah, don't blame the dog. Anything a dog does is either because YOU taught it to, intentionally or not, or because it's an ANIMAL not a perfect little furry human. It astounds me, having also worked with exotic animals, that if a parrot or an iguana or a chinchilla bites you, any animal handler will say it's your fault, you're the human, you need to respect the animal. But if a dog bites someone, it's all, "Bad dog! That was unacceptable behavior! Time to punish the dog!!!" 
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:iconsoulful-purple-wolf:
Soulful-Purple-Wolf Featured By Owner Mar 30, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I can definitely see where you're coming from :) thanks for your thoughts!
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:iconsassawj:
sassawj Featured By Owner Oct 3, 2013
I do really love this stamp, this is very true for the most part and I agree with almost all of it, but like another has already mentioned - not all traits can be trained out as they are bred / hardwired into the dog, and I think it may be a good choice to change some of the wording around, if you do not mind me suggesting. You said: "Overall, the Dog's manners are dependent on you. This goes for Fighting Dogs too. If the dog was not raised to fight, the dog would not do this!"
That statement is untrue and I will explain why, whether you are already well educated in this area or not, I just want to thoroughly describe what the error is in that statement for not only you but for anyone else that may read my comment, because I feel it is important to emphasize how temperament and other traits cannot be changed with any amount of socialization and training.

Explanation: Temperament is something that is often inherited, be it a desirable temperament that is stable, or a poor, unstable temperament; only irresponsible / "backyard" breeders would ever breed a dog that has an unstable temperament and the potential of having any level of aggression. That being said, there are other traits in dogs that are bred into them such as instinct and drive, going way back to when groups of alike dogs were first developed and accounted for as established purebred breeds with distinct features to create ideal working dogs for a purpose.
The Border Collie is born with a high prey drive and the instincts needed to become a herding dog, even if a Border Collie was never introduced to herding livestock and has been raised solely as a pet - point being, training is not needed to bring out an instinct in a dog special to its breed, it is naturally hardwired into the dog from the very beginning of its life. The Whippet was bred for racing and hare coursing, the breed has a high prey drive and the instinct to hunt, a Whippet will naturally chase down a small animal it spots in the yard, even if the dog has been trained properly and has been socialized with smaller animals - point being, no amount of training could ever eliminate or change the Whippet's drive to chase

Point Being: Now that I gave those two examples, let me move on to the real point of my comment here concerning your statement "if the dog was not raised to fight, the dog would not do this": To put it in short instead of writing several more unnecessary paragraphs that no one wants to read - the American Pit Bull Terrier was bred for tenacity, fearlessness, drive, gameness and of course aggression, these dogs are natural born fighters, just as a Border Collie is a natural born herder, the Whippet is a natural born hunter, the Great Pyrenees is a natural born guardian and the Golden Retriever is a natural born retriever; animal aggression is a trait that has been bred into the APBT and comes natural to them, and no amount of training can change that - which is why I had to say that the statement "if the dog was not raised to fight, the dog would not do this" is untrue, as even an APBT born and raised as a pet by a responsible owner that has trained the dog well, that dog still can have some level of animal / dog aggression and the drive to fight and the gameness to finish the fight

Anyway, again, I love this stamp, I just now added it to the front page of my group %stopBSL; also, I will repeat, even if you are already perfectly aware of everything I wrote here, I still wanted to post this comment anyway should another person read my comment and learn something from it that they hadn't known before. And I really hope that you do not mind my post, also I am sorry that this was so long! :)
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:iconsoulful-purple-wolf:
Soulful-Purple-Wolf Featured By Owner Oct 4, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I'm gonna have to disagree with you on the level that American Pit Bull Terriers (or Pits) are "natural born fighters." That is the point of view that is causing Breed Specific Legislation, so I'm not sure why you are running a group that claims "to demote the undeserved stereotypes among man's best friend, the dog." Not all Pits want to fight and kill other dogs. There are goldens that want to fight other dogs, and there's lazy whippets who don't want to chase things. You CANNOT stereotype a dog based on their breed. You can only get an idea of the dog based on the breed.

I understand you have your point of view, but Pits are NOT inherently dangerous. The desire to maul doesn't run through their veins. Their jaws do not lock. I know 4 Pits personally, all were adopted. 1 is dog aggressive, and the other 3 are not. With those odds, I'd say that the first dog's experiences before being adopted probably had more to do with his dog aggression than his breeding, especially since he isn't even pure Pit, he's half lab. The other 3 are pure Pit and love to play with other dogs. In addition, that aggressive pit LEARNED TO LIVE WITH ANOTHER DOG. Dogs can be trained out of bad habits if you work with them and help them along.

There is no scientific data stating that Pit Bull Type Dogs are more likely to bite, or be dog aggressive than a Golden or a Poodle. Yes, we hear more about Pits attacking people, because that's what the news wants to share. They will tell informants to only tell them of bites if the dog is a Pit or Pit-type dog.

Yes, I'm all for responsible breeding, but the breeding is not the main factor in a dog's personality. Just like a kid, if the kid is born of irresponsible parents, and then is removed from the bad environment, then there's a significantly higher chance the kid will not be like his birth parents. If we left that kid with his irresponsible parents, he will do what they do.

Do not assume that Pits bred to fight cannot make good pets. I'll bet 90%-99% of the pits seen in shelters are bred for the ring. Don't cast them away because they were "bred to fight."

I know retrievers who don't retrieve, APBTs who aren't aggressive, Huskies who hate running, and Rotties who don't guard. Just because a dog is designed to do something, doesn't mean that they will be that way. You must look at the individual, not the breed. I'm very aware that I will not change your mind, but I want to make it very clear to my viewers that I do not agree with your position. You're welcome to have it, but I do not think it truly fits with your group.
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:iconsassawj:
sassawj Featured By Owner Oct 4, 2013
Well, unfortunately you are wrong, but that is probably because I feel you did not quite see the point that I was attempting to make concerning genetics, temperament and distinctive traits that set breeds apart from one another, going back far as when these breeds first originated for a sole purpose before they became companion animals and members of the family, and I am speaking strictly about dog breeds as a whole because in general dogs will meet their breeds standards in having distinctive traits in temperament and instinct special to their breed, though I think it is a little too obvious that there is always an exception to the rule based on the dog's individuality, but I am solely speaking about the breeds, not the individual dogs. Simply put, the APBT is prone to dog / animal aggression, which is a natural trait found in their breed, just as the instinct to chase down small game is a natural trait found in most hunting breeds; yes there are exceptions, some dogs bred for a specific purpose do not quite fit the breed standards in temperament and other traits that were bred into that individual's breed for a purpose, but what you need to understand is dog / animal aggression is simply a natural trait in the APBT whether  an individual displays such aggression or not.

Pointing out that this breed or that breed has very specific traits that make them distinguished is not stereotyping, it is stating factual information in terms of how their breed came to be and what their initial purpose was when first established through selective breeding of desirable traits to produce an ideal working dog, but I suppose I can understand why someone like you would accuse me of such. It is funny that while I state the fact that APBTs are prone to DA, it is considered a stereotype in your mind and those that are like you, but if I had said anything along the lines of APBTs making the greatest, most loyal dogs and absolute best family pets, you would immediately applaud that statement even though that could be looked at as stereotyping as well, it just does not bother any pit bull advocates because it is something positive about APBTs.

Never did I state that APBTs are "more likely to bite" because that simply is not the case, never did I say "desire to maul runs through their veins" because it simply does not,  and never did I say APBTs are "inherently dangerous" because again that is not at all true either. Dog / animal aggression is a natural trait in the breed, also found in many other breeds, even some that are not related to the APBT, but that does not make them "inherently dangerous", and lastly never did I say that APBTs could not live with other dogs, because again that is not true, it is entirely possible for an APBT to share its home with other animals - I was speaking about the breed, generalizing it based on the generations of selective breeding to create the ideal fighting dog with all the traits, drive, gameness and tenacity desired for the breed when it was first coming into development; it just might have been a good idea to actually read what I wrote but in turn you had to accuse me of saying such absolute nonsense simply because I did not write another paragraph about what great pets APBTs are for the right family and living situation, but due to leaving that out you are clearly under the assumption that I have it out for pit bulls, when you do not quite see how stating the truths both positive and "negative" is responsible advocacy, and is really just being honest.

Openly admitting that the APBT has the potential to be dangerous just like any other large, powerful, high prey driven breed is not what has lead to breed-specific legislation, what that is called is being a responsible owner / breeder or advocate. Breed-specific laws came to be due to irresponsible breeding of dogs with poor temperaments and irresponsible owners of potential dangerous dogs that were denied proper training, socialization & / or kept under control, and it is the lack of knowledge, the misinformation and myths that adds fuel to the fire. Any responsible owner / breeder of an APBT that is well educated about their breed will concur that their dogs are potentially dangerous because of the breed's dog / animal aggression and drive to fight. BSL did not come about because of well informed dog enthusiasts being fully aware of APBTs being prone to dog aggression and having the potential to be dangerous, so your entire response to me was quite demeaning and harsh, stemming straight from your own misinformation, and again, misinformation is the problem here - not stating both positive and negative truths about the breed

This is actually an interesting read, it's very thought provoking:  thetruthaboutpitbulls.blogspot…

Now, what am I doing running a group against BSL, you ask? Unlike other advocates who have nothing but wonderful things to say about pit bulls, I on the other hand am happy to state both the good and bad traits in the APBT, I do the very same with every other breed yet not a soul could care, but dare I mention APBTs being prone to dog aggression it is the end of the world and I am made out to be the bad person! I run the group quite well with much success, thank you very much. But do not worry, I will remove your stamp from our front page because in our group we do not tolerate misinformation, and unfortunately this nice stamp does give out misinformation. But I can see my post took us nowhere and was entirely useless.  I honestly thought that there was a fair shot at having a decent discussion in an adult like manner and level heads, but I can see I was mislead here, being that I can clearly see that I struck a nerve here and upset you in the process, though it was not my intention. But I will not argue with you if you have to stoop down to such a level to accuse me of total bull; if anyone's point of view needs to be changed, it might be yours, and honestly it is point of views like yours that give pit bull advocates a bad reputation all their own. In any case, because "arguing" with you is a totally fruitless endeavor, I won't be responding any further, and I am very sorry that my comment upset you so much
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:iconsoulful-purple-wolf:
Soulful-Purple-Wolf Featured By Owner Oct 5, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
just so you understand, I was not upset with you. I merely expressed my opinion. You're not going to change my mind, nor am I going to change yours. People are set in their ways and not much is going to change that except personal experiences.
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:iconeveryday-im-wumboing:
i agree.
i hate how people stereotype dog breeds such as pittbulls and rottweilers over bad owners.
i own a rottweiler, and he's very sweet. there are more good owners than bad.
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:iconsoulful-purple-wolf:
Soulful-Purple-Wolf Featured By Owner Sep 26, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I'm glad you agree :)
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:iconeveryday-im-wumboing:
thank you. i'm glad someone spoke out for this. 
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:iconsoulful-purple-wolf:
Soulful-Purple-Wolf Featured By Owner Sep 27, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
You're welcome :)
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:icongalaxiesis:
Galaxiesis Featured By Owner Sep 8, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I agree with you! It's the owner's responsibility to handle their dogs and any bad habit are based on how the person treat their animal. People always dump their pets as owner surrender making lame excuses such as "ohh my dog isn't potty trained", "ohh my dog chews on the furniture", "ohh my dog won't stop barking" blah blah blah. If you're not going to keep your loving companion for the rest of their life, then don't think about owning one. 
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:iconsoulful-purple-wolf:
Soulful-Purple-Wolf Featured By Owner Sep 9, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Exactly!!
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:iconpichu263:
pichu263 Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Exactly. My neighbor across the street from me has a.. well.. "labradoodle" and when ever it sees me and my sister walking either back to our house or to a friend's house in the neighborhood, it runs toward us and sometimes barks. My sister is also terrified of dogs, so it doesn't help when she has a giant (tall) dog running straight for her as fast as it can.
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:iconsoulful-purple-wolf:
Soulful-Purple-Wolf Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
It's never fun when a dog barks aggressively at you. Try to remain calm and never ever run.
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:iconpichu263:
pichu263 Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
I tell her that, and I try to make it so that I'm in front of her so that she isn't able to be seen by the dog. I once was nearly knocked over by a huge dog in my neighborhood named Oakley aka "The Polar Bear".  He was bigger (taller) than their other dog, a full grown golden retriever at 1 year old.
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:iconsoulful-purple-wolf:
Soulful-Purple-Wolf Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
sounds like they need some doggy manners!
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:iconpichu263:
pichu263 Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
XD Doggy manners, the word doggy kinda kills the serious mood we were in. *yay*
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:iconsoulful-purple-wolf:
Soulful-Purple-Wolf Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
lol, yes.
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:iconsleazinator:
Sleazinator Featured By Owner Jul 1, 2013   General Artist
This stamp is so true.
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:iconsoulful-purple-wolf:
Soulful-Purple-Wolf Featured By Owner Jul 1, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thanks
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:iconsleazinator:
Sleazinator Featured By Owner Jul 1, 2013   General Artist
No problem.
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:iconmoonlitinuyasha1985:
moonlitinuyasha1985 Featured By Owner Jun 10, 2013
Exactly!
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:iconsoulful-purple-wolf:
Soulful-Purple-Wolf Featured By Owner Jun 11, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thanks :)
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:iconmoonlitinuyasha1985:
moonlitinuyasha1985 Featured By Owner Jun 11, 2013
You're welcome!:)
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:iconzest1513:
zest1513 Featured By Owner Jun 10, 2013
This is spot on!
:icongreatjobplz:
I've had my dog since she was a few weeks old and once she was trained, I've never really had a single problem with her behavior. I could leave a full chicken dinner in the middle of the floor, tell her not to touch it, and I could leave the room knowing she won't...but I wouldn't do that because that's just mean! :giggle:
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:iconsoulful-purple-wolf:
Soulful-Purple-Wolf Featured By Owner Jun 11, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Haha, sounds like you have a great pup :) Good work on that training!
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:iconmwezii:
mwezii Featured By Owner Jun 7, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Very true, and I totally agree. That's why I hate people's nasty little spoiled purse dogs. My family, unfortunately, has trouble with our current dog because we got him when he was already two, and he spent his entire life in a crate. Damn thing is 135 pounds.
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:iconsoulful-purple-wolf:
Soulful-Purple-Wolf Featured By Owner Jun 8, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
poor guy :( Those sort of cases are really hard. I wish you luck ^.^
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:iconmwezii:
mwezii Featured By Owner Jun 8, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Yeah. He's pretty good now, though. My dad is a bit rough, unfortunately. Thanks.
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:iconsoulful-purple-wolf:
Soulful-Purple-Wolf Featured By Owner Jun 8, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
It's tough when everyone in the house doesn't have the same training style.
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:iconmwezii:
mwezii Featured By Owner Jun 8, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
It really is. Not to mention that my dad uses dispelling the dogs as a way to take out anger.
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:iconsoulful-purple-wolf:
Soulful-Purple-Wolf Featured By Owner Jun 8, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
:( Not cool
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:iconalika613:
Alika613 Featured By Owner Sep 9, 2011
We do teach or dogs a lot, even bad things, even sometimes without realizing we are teaching it at all. But there are some things that just aren't an owners fault.

Like a dog who is attacked by another dog and is now reactive and fear aggressive with other dogs. I can't blame that on the owner. If you are walking your dog and out of nowhere a strange dog comes charging and attacks, a) it's hard to prevent, you can't make other people control their aggressive dogs, b) it's hard to stop, breaking up a dog fight is damn hard, especially is they are a large/powerful breed, and c) it can be hard for any dog to overcome that. I've heard of a lot of SDs who get washed out of the program they are in because of 1 bad experience the owner/handler had no control over (which is why nowadays the "bring your SDiT puppy everywhere with you" mentality is falling out of favor. Because if you bring your pup with you everywhere you CAN'T control everything, and you can't make sure a bad experience doesn't happen during a fear stage. So now it's advised that you carefully plan every interaction, who will be there, will it be a positive experience for the puppy, etc, etc).

Some behaviors are also genetic, and some are medically based.

But I think the biggest message people should know is that BLAME DOESN'T SOLVE PROBLEMS. ACTION solve problems, DESENSITIZATION solves problems, TRAINING solves problems (and occasionally medication may be needed or if it is a genetic thing you have to decide what is right for you and the dog).

But I like the stamp, :), it's true in a lot of cases.
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:iconsoulful-purple-wolf:
Soulful-Purple-Wolf Featured By Owner Sep 9, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Agree, this stamp certainly does not cover all the ifs ands or buts :P
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:iconalika613:
Alika613 Featured By Owner Sep 9, 2011
Haha, the other day my dog was barking at the cat, so I called him to me and gave him a treat for coming. I was distracted on the laptop, but after several repetitions I realized I was training him to bark at the cat and then come running back to me.

Silly human!
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:iconsoulful-purple-wolf:
Soulful-Purple-Wolf Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
XD Thats awesome
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:icondiamond-inuyasha:
diamond-inuyasha Featured By Owner May 8, 2011
I have 2 dogs both rescues one is my service dog odd enough almost fully trained when I got her from the shelter I got my pet just before she made it to a shelter she was a different case she was wild ran from us she did almost everything but bite but now she's tame & comes to us & has no fear of the family good training is amazing:)
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:iconsoulful-purple-wolf:
Soulful-Purple-Wolf Featured By Owner May 8, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Yes, it's amazing what good training can do for a difficult dog!! Thanks for sharing your story!

I raise service dogs ^.^ It's exciting to see a service dog owner on DA!
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:icondiamond-inuyasha:
diamond-inuyasha Featured By Owner May 8, 2011
Chase *my pet* still has issues but she's come a long way & yes I seen where you raise service dogs i'm thankful for people like you because so many service dog users can't train their own dog keep up the great work:)
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:iconsoulful-purple-wolf:
Soulful-Purple-Wolf Featured By Owner May 8, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Haha, my dog rufus has so many issues, It's so sad.

Aww, thanks! I'm happy we can help in the small way we do!
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:icondiamond-inuyasha:
diamond-inuyasha Featured By Owner May 8, 2011
He sounds hard like Chase & you're welcome:)
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:iconneinna-maranwe:
Neinna-Maranwe Featured By Owner May 1, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Well for the most part, I agree. But some things are built in to dogs, not all of them are nice. I have a corgi, a dog bred to nip ankles of cattle and pigs to herd them. He's snapped at people when they run, simply because it's what he's supposed to do. We never taught him that, he can't help it.

Some dogs just obey their genes, and it can be a problem, especially if the owner is just a person who wants a companion and doesn't train them will every they've got.
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:iconsoulful-purple-wolf:
Soulful-Purple-Wolf Featured By Owner May 1, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
This is very true. There are certain things that we cannot train out of dogs. That's why when people pick breeds, they should pay attention to the features of the dogs. Like, if I don't like my heels nipped, I would not get a corgi kind of a deal.

But yes, some things are hard to train out, but there are many things that can be fixed. Some people don't feel it is necessary for a long time then get angry when the dog does things later in life and it is harder to fix. Like a puppy nipping ears. It's cute until that dog is big enough to eat your ear, then people get upset. I hope that makes sense XD

Thanks for commenting
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:iconblacksouldog:
BlackSoulDog Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2011
I have been training dogs professionally for the last 6 years, this stamp is perfect. :D
In the hundreds of dogs I have worked with only two were not handler/owner error. Both problems turned out to have a medical reason. One was brain damage from oxygen depervation as a pup and the other a thyroid condition. So while a handfull of dogs might not be wired right, MOST are just fine dogs with lazy or uneducated owners.
Poor training and lack of early socialization is what lands many dogs on death row. Honestly I'd love to see more of a push for required training of pet dogs.
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:iconsoulful-purple-wolf:
Soulful-Purple-Wolf Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I think that people should need a license in order to have pets. I mean, some people are able to train their pups, but the number of people who don't know what they are doing is terribly sad :( Thanks for the awesome comment
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:iconblacksouldog:
BlackSoulDog Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2011
Where I live we have to license that the dog recives the rabies vaccine. Rabies is a public health concern so it is mandatory by local law that your dog must be proven vaccinated or you face fines or even having your dog taken.
To me an untrained dog is also a public health concern. An artical from "Total Dog Magazine" ( Here ---> [link] ) outlines the 5 Most Dangerous Dogs, and it is not what many people will expect to read, but it is the glaring truth. That truth is that the dogs that pose the most risk to harm a human, are those that are poorly handled by humans.
Many rescues I have worked with localy are now pushing for manditory training class enrollment as part of the adoption contract on a dog. I believe this should become the goal of rescues, shelters, and responcable breeders, to ensure that the dogs they send home have the BEST chance of remaining in their homes for life.
I have a huge soapbox about proper training but I'm going to step off here or I'll just keep on ranting. :D
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:iconsoulful-purple-wolf:
Soulful-Purple-Wolf Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
This is all so true! I love the idea of mandatory training sessions. I've been training service dogs since 2005. I have to admit, before I was an atrocious dog owner!! My dogs are table serving socialized and crazy XD Some is because one is obviously mentally handicapped, but I'm still ashamed of them. I've tried to fix them, but my fam stops after I leave for college >.> They're so old now, it's a loss cause, but still.

After working with the service dogs, I could never let my pets be that bad again. I think sometimes people don't realize how bad their dogs really are until they take that step back Which is sad.
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:iconkissthethunder:
KissTheThunder Featured By Owner Jan 8, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
I gotta say, I think there's a larger picture here. I've seen people do their very best with dogs, get help with them, have them trained, train them hard themselves, but still the dog won't change. =/ It happens.

I'm all for people taking accountability, but blaming everything on the owner is no more right than blaming everything on the dog. Just my thoughts <3
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:iconmakoce:
Makoce Featured By Owner Mar 17, 2011   Digital Artist
Well, sometimes it comes down to the energy and actions of the owners. That dog is just not a good fit for them, they can't live up to its expectations. You know now a days, everyone is so busy who has time to walk their dog for at least an hour depending on the breed? A dog whos hyper, pent up with all this energy and frustration isn't going to listen despite all the training and hard work in the world. From my experience helping out training owners dogs, you can have the dog acting like a perfect angle for you, but when returned to the owner: despite your best instruction and guidance, they cannot get the same result as you.
I agree sometimes it is the dog: Bag genetics, a mental disorder as a result from genetics, or maybe the fact that the dog has such a hard en-grained habit ( Like severe aggression ) that only a professional would be suited for maintaining the dog. Because yes, not all dogs can be fixed.
Rambling aside from this, the stamp in a general WHOLE of most of the common problems dogs have, or get sent to shelter for, are probably I'd guess 98% preventable.
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:iconsoulful-purple-wolf:
Soulful-Purple-Wolf Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you for responding to that comment so nicely. It is appreciated!
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